Valheim’s new patch makes stealth even better 

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Image: Iron Gate/Coffee Stain Games

Plus, you can see who sees you in stealth

Valheim is a viking sandbox survival game that’s currently blowing up on Steam, selling one million copies since launching in early access. On Wednesday, developer Iron Gate put out an update that makes a few things more manageable.

The two biggest changes that players should know about relate to stealth and deathsquitos. Stealth now has a HUD that shows whether enemies are alerted to your presence or not. Stealth attacks, especially with a knife or bow, do a ton of damage to enemies, so it’s nice to know whether you’re able to land a devastating shot or not. Deathsquitos, an apt name for giant mosquito enemies who used to one-shot vikings, have also been nerfed to do less damage.

Here are the full patch notes released by Iron Gate, which are minimalist but add some nice quality of life changes. It looks like players will have a rougher time teleporting ore across the map, as well as duping resources, so fans who are relying on sneaky methods of getting ahead should be aware of this new patch.

* Ragdoll destruction network fix

* Dedicated server ugly file-flag shutdown system removed (Use CTRL-C or SIGINT instead)

* Updated reference server start scripts (Please update local copies)

* World & character save improvements

* Teleport ore chest hack fix

* Remove structure resource dupe bug fix

* Server map set to server name to make it filterable in steam server-browser

* Localization fixes

* Added enemy awareness indicator to enemy huds

* Sneak tweaks

* Added save directory override to dedicated servers (-savedir)

* AI fixes

* Lower dmg on deathsquitos

* Fixed text-msg icon

* Updated server manual PDF

* More serverlist improvements (removed initial serverlist request to lower network trafic)

* Carts detach when teleporting

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